Kommer Bave and Ciccone LLP General Practice Law Firm

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Creating Trusts

Understanding the Common Types of Trusts

Aug 3, 2022

A trust is a legal arrangement through which one person (or an institution, such as a bank or law firm), called a “trustee,” holds legal title to property for another person, called a “beneficiary.” Trusts fall into two basic categories: testamentary and inter vivos. A testamentary trust is one created by your will, and it does not come into existence until you die. In contrast, an inter vivos trust, starts during your lifetime. You create it now and it exists during your life. There are two kinds of inter vivos trusts: revocable and irrevocable. Revocable Trusts Revocable trusts are often…

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Understanding Revocable Trusts

Understanding Revocable Trusts

Aug 3, 2022

Revocable trusts are an effective way to avoid probate and provide for asset management in the event of incapacity. In addition, revocable trusts — sometimes called “living” trusts — are incredibly flexible and can achieve many other goals. A trust is a legal arrangement through which one person holds legal title to property for another person. As the creator of a revocable trust, you are called the “grantor” or the “donor.” While you are alive, you are a beneficiary of the trust and can also serve as either the sole trustee or as one of a number of co-trustees. The…

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Special Needs Trust Planning

What Is a Special Needs Trust?

Aug 3, 2022

Americans are living longer than they did in years past, including those with disabilities. Planning by parents can make all the difference in the life of a child with a disability, as well as that of his or her siblings who may be left with the responsibility for caretaking, on top of their own careers and caring for their own families. Special needs trusts (also known as “supplemental needs trusts”) are an important component of planning for a disabled child, even though the child may be an adult by the time the trust is created or funded. These trusts allow…

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Elder Law Medicaid Planning

Why You Should Use a Lawyer for Medicaid Planning

Jul 20, 2022

Many seniors and their families don’t use a lawyer to plan for long-term care or Medicaid, often because they’re afraid of the cost. But an attorney can help you save money in the long run as well as make sure you are getting the best care for your loved one. Instead of taking steps based on what you’ve heard from others, doing nothing, or enlisting a non-lawyer referred by a nursing home, you can hire an elder law attorney. Here are a few reasons why you should at least consider this option: No conflict of interest. When nursing homes refer…

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How to Get Into a Nursing Home as a Medicaid Recipient

How to Get Into a Nursing Home as a Medicaid Recipient

Jul 20, 2022

While Medicaid helps pay for nursing home care, being admitted to a nursing home as a Medicaid recipient is not always easy. There are several ways to navigate the process, depending on your situation. With the median cost of a nursing home room being more than $250 a day, most families need help paying for long-term care. Medicaid is the primary method of covering the costs for nursing home care in the United States, but in order to qualify for Medicaid, an applicant must have limited income and assets. Generally, nursing homes will only accept patients who can pay for…

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Elder Law Planning

What Is Medicaid?

Jul 20, 2022

Medicaid is a joint federal-state program that provides health insurance coverage to low-income children, seniors, and people with disabilities. In addition, it covers care in a nursing home for those who qualify. In the absence of any other public program covering long-term care, Medicaid has become the default nursing home insurance of the middle class. Lacking access to alternatives such as paying privately or being covered by a long-term care insurance policy, most people pay out of their own pockets for long-term care until they become eligible for Medicaid. As for home care, Medicaid has traditionally offered very little —…

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Estate Planning

Why Everyone Should Have an Estate Plan

Jul 11, 2022

Do you have a will? A durable power of attorney? A health care proxy? If so, no reason to read on. If not, why not? Failure to create an estate plan risks causing discord in your family for generations to come. The following are four often stated reasons for not having an estate plan: Just Not Getting Around to It A discussion of why everyone needs an estate plan starts with a consideration of what “estate” means and what “estate plan” means. Your “estate” is simply everything you own: bank accounts, stock, real estate, motor vehicles, jewelry, household furniture, retirement…

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The Difference Between Elder Law and Estate Planning

Jul 11, 2022

Elder law and estate planning serve two different — but equally vital — functions. The main difference is that elder law is focused on preserving your assets during your lifetime, while estate planning concentrates on what happens to your assets after you die. Elder law planning is concerned with ensuring that seniors live long, healthy, and financially secure lives. It usually involves anticipating future medical needs, including long-term care. Elder law attorneys can help you develop a plan to pay for future care while preserving some of your assets. They can also assist you with qualifying for Medicaid or other benefits…

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Medicaid Planning

Married Couples Need an Estate Plan

Jul 11, 2022

Don’t assume your estate will automatically go to your spouse when you die. If you don’t have an estate plan, your spouse may have to share your estate with other family members. If you die without an estate plan, the state will decide where your assets go. Each state has laws that determine what will happen to your estate if you don’t have a will. If you are married, most states award one-third to one-half of your estate to your spouse, with the rest divided among your children or, if you don’t have children, to other living relatives such as…

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Don’t Forget to Fund Your Revocable Trust

Dec 14, 2020

Revocable trusts are a very popular and useful estate planning tool. But the trust will be ineffective if you do not actually place your assets in the trust. Revocable trusts are an effective way to avoid probate and provide for asset management in the event of incapacity. In addition, revocable trusts — sometimes called “living” trusts — are incredibly flexible as you can also put out of state property in the trust and avoid ancillary probate in that state or you can also avoid lengthy ancestry searches if you have only distant heirs as well as have more seamless administration…

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